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Implementing the CIS 20 Critical Security Controls: Building Upon Foundational Cyber Hygiene

Most successful cyber attacks exploit known vulnerabilities for which patches are available, or take advantage of weak configuration settings that could have been easily hardened. You can significantly lower the risk of being victimized by this type of common, preventable attack by adopting the Center for Internet Security’s Critical Security Controls (CSCs).

This set of 20 structured InfoSec best practices offers a methodical and sensible plan for securing your IT environment, and maps to most security control frameworks, government regulations, contractual obligations and industry mandates.

The CSCs were first developed in 2008 and are periodically updated by a global community of volunteer cybersecurity experts from government, academia and industry. “The CIS Controls provide a prioritized approach to cyber security, starting with the most essential tasks and progressing to more sophisticated techniques,” Tony Sager, CIS Chief Evangelist, wrote recently.

In this blog series, we’re explaining how Qualys Cloud Platform — a single, integrated, end-to-end platform for discovery, prevention, detection, and response — and its Qualys Cloud Apps can help security teams of any size to broadly and comprehensively adopt the CIS controls.

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New ‘Silence’ Banking Trojan copies Carbanak to Steal from Banks (Analysis with IOCs)

Dark Reading is reporting on a new banking trojan called ‘Silence’ that mimics techniques similar to the Carbanak hacker group targeting banks and financial institutions.  The attack vector is similar – target individuals using spear-phish emails to trick them into running a malicious attachment which will connect to download a dropper to further infect the user’s machine.  This attack does not use an exploit against a vulnerability, but rather takes advantage of social engineering to fool the user into executing the malicious payload and infecting their machine.

Silence is interesting in that the trojan’s capabilities include a screen grabber that will take multiple screenshots of the user’s active monitor and upload the real-time stream to a command and control server for monitoring by the adversary.  This technique allows the threat actor to identify which users have access to specific banking applications, systems, and accounts that they can use for financial gain.

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