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June 2019 Patch Tuesday – 88 Vulns, 21 Critical, Hyper-V Escape, Adobe Vulns

This month’s Microsoft Patch Tuesday addresses 88 vulnerabilities with 21 of them labeled as Critical. Of the 21 Critical vulns, 17 are for scripting engines and browsers, and 3 are potential hypervisor escapes in Hyper-V. The remaining vulnerability is an RCE in the Microsoft Speech API. Microsoft also issued guidance on Bluetooth Low Energy FIDO keys, HoloLens, and Microsoft Exchange. Adobe issues patches today for Flash, ColdFusion, and Campaign.

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Integrating Threat and Vulnerability Management with Patch Management: The (Feasible) Quantum Leap

The rise of sophisticated attacks combined with the security-skills shortage have driven many organizations to go back to basics and review their processes for vulnerability and patch management. The approach is definitely a winning one, given that shrinking and managing the vulnerability surface makes it harder to target and compromise.

Assessing the attack surface requires strengthening key capabilities, such as increasing visibility across the IT landscape and improving the detection, prioritization and remediation of vulnerabilities at scale. Qualys has been boosting these capabilities for its customers over the last two decades.

Read on to learn how Qualys is addressing enterprises’ patch management challenges with integrated breach prevention that includes its new Patch Management cloud application.

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Boosting Patch Management Is Key for Breach Prevention

Vulnerabilities that vendors have disclosed and issued patches for remain a major source of breaches. Why? Too many organizations take too long to deploy those patches — or never do.

That was the case with WannaCry. The ransomware exploited Windows vulnerability MS17-010, which Microsoft disclosed in mid-March 2017, rating it “Critical” and issuing a patch for it. The attacks began two months later. It was only then that most affected organizations began to install the patch. When the dust cleared, WannaCry had infected 300,000-plus systems, disrupting critical operations globally.

So why does this baffling problem persist?

As is true for most IT and security challenges, the patch management problem and its solution depend on a combination of the technology being used and of the processes in place.

Read on to learn about patch management best practices, and about Qualys’ new patch management cloud app.

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Verizon’s DBIR Highlights Key Drivers of Security Risk

It’s that time of the year when Verizon updates us on the latest trends in the global threat landscape with its Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR). The findings in this year’s report are based on data provided by more than 70 sources (including Qualys) about more than 41,000 security incidents, including more than 2,000 confirmed data breaches, across a variety of geographies (over 80 countries) and industries. A privileged observation point indeed.

While the very informative 78-page report touches on a wide range of areas,  I’ll focus on three that are particularly relevant for Qualys customers:

  • Who are hackers’ preferred targets, and why
  • The importance of reducing both the time it takes to discover security problems, such as vulnerabilities or breaches, and the time it takes to fix them
  • How lack of visibility, human error and careless misconfigurations heighten organizations’ security risks

Read on to learn more about the evolution (or is it “EVILution”) of the threat landscape in the past year, and find out about recommended actions.

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QSC18 Virtual Edition: Vulnerability Risk Management

When vulnerability risk management is proactive, organizations don’t have to hurriedly react to attacks that exploit bugs for which patches are available, as happened with WannaCry. 

“The vast majority of WannaCry remediation took place as an emergency type process,” Jimmy Graham, a Qualys Director of Product Management, said during QSC18 Virtual Edition.

It’s key to have an integrated breach prevention program with asset inventory, vulnerability management, threat prioritization and patch management, he said

Graham also outlined how Qualys can help customers comprehensively and proactively manage their vulnerability risk.

Read on to learn more.

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The Sky Is Falling! Responding Rationally to Headline Vulnerabilities

It’s happening more and more.

Gill Langston, a Qualys Director of Product Management, speaks at RSA Conference 2018

High profile vulnerabilities like Meltdown and Spectre are disclosed, and become headline-grabbing news not just in the technology press, but on general news outlets worldwide.

Even if the vulnerabilities aren’t associated with an attack, the news reports rattle C-level executives, who ask the security team for a plan to address the by now notorious bug, and pronto.

Often, a counter-productive disruption of the normal vulnerability and patch management operations ensues, as those involved scramble to draft a response against the clock in a panic atmosphere, punctuated by confusion and finger-pointing.

“Should I just immediately be jumping and reacting? Should I start deploying patches, and then go from there? I’m going to argue that that’s not always the case,” Gill Langston, a Product Management Director at Qualys, said Wednesday during a presentation at RSA Conference 2018.

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Microsoft Misfires with Meltdown Patch, while WannaCry Pops Up at Boeing

In our weekly roundup of InfoSec happenings, we start, as has often been the case this year, with concerning Meltdown / Spectre news — this time involving Microsoft — and also touch on a password hack at Under Armour, a WannaCry infection at Boeing, and a severe Drupal vulnerability.

Microsoft patches its Meltdown patch, then patches it again

In an instance of the cure possibly being worse than the disease, a Microsoft patch for Meltdown released in January created a gaping security hole in certain systems in which it was installed.

It took Microsoft two tries to fix the issue, which affects Windows 7 (x64) and Windows Server 2008 R2 (x64) systems. The company thought it had solved the vulnerability (CVE-2018-1038) with a scheduled patch last Tuesday, but then had to rush out an emergency fix two days later.

Security researcher Ulf Frisk, who discovered the vulnerability, called it “way worse” than Meltdown because it “allowed any process to read the complete memory contents at gigabytes per second” and made it possible to write to arbitrary memory as well.

“No fancy exploits were needed. Windows 7 already did the hard work of mapping in the required memory into every running process,” Frisk wrote. “Exploitation was just a matter of read and write to already mapped in-process virtual memory. No fancy APIs or syscalls required — just standard read and write.”

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Recline on the Qualys Couch: Examining Patching Behavior

In a perfect world, organizations would patch vulnerabilities immediately after they’re disclosed, preemptively blocking exploits and dodging most cyber attacks.

Of course, reality is far from that hypothetically ideal state. Organizations often leave critical vulnerabilities unpatched for months, even years. Hackers routinely feast on all that low-hanging fruit to hijack systems, steal data, deface websites and disrupt operations.

We all know it’s impossible to patch every single vulnerability. Thousands are disclosed every year, and patching systems can be complicated, time-consuming and inconvenient. But InfoSec teams agree that fixing the most dangerous bugs on a timely basis is not only doable but also necessary.

The problem is that prioritizing remediation and pinpointing those critical vulnerabilities is difficult when — as is often the case — organizations lack continuous and automated vulnerability management, asset inventorying and threat analysis.

Unsurprisingly, recent Qualys data on patching behavior shows that remediation activity is directly related to the level of risk attached to specific vulnerabilities. And in some cases, specifically when it comes to the realm of IoT devices, patching is always slow, and often non-existent.

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Securing IT Assets By Prioritizing Protection And Remediation

As hackers get faster at weaponizing exploits for disclosed bugs, InfoSec teams need — more than ever — automated, continuous and precise IT asset inventorying, vulnerability management, threat prioritization and patch deployment.

Critical vulnerabilities that linger unpatched for weeks or months offer hackers easy opportunities to breach systems. These bugs open the door for bad guys to steal confidential data, hijack PCs, commit financial fraud and create mayhem.

The WannaCry ransomware attack, which infected 300,000-plus systems and disrupted critical operations globally in mid-May 2017, highlighted the importance of timely vulnerability remediation.

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